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Jun 11, 2014 by Lucy Anderson and Paul Henry
I told one of my friends recently that the corks in champagne bottles don’t originally start off mushroom-shaped, and that they are cylindrical like standard corks, only changing shape due to the time spent in bottle under pressure and the wire cage holding them in place. She didn’t believe me, but it’s true… Some other things to know about champagne so that you can impress your friends: 1)      It’s only called champagne if it comes from the Champagne region in France.  A few years ago the EU protected regional names,...
Aug 19, 2013 by Julian Skeels
Bordeaux is the easiest fine wine to buy and, despite price increases in the last few years, remains one of the very best value.  The trick is knowing which wines punch above their weight and provide ‘classed-growth’ quality at table-wine prices.Here are my suggestions, by major Bordeaux region:MargauxFrequently over-priced and inconsistent, this is one of the most difficult regions to find value in.  However, it is worth the effort to seek out these wines – which have some of the most wonderful aromas in Bordeaux, for example violets and blueberries. ...
Jul 18, 2013 by Debra Meiburg MW
To dispel any lingering confusion, Tokay (pronounced toh-kai) is the English spelling of Tokaji, which means wine from the Tokaj region.  The Tokaj vineyards are planted on the low foothills where the great Hungarian plains meet the Carpathian Mountains.  The wine that really put Tokaj on the map is Tokaji Aszú, widely regarded as one of the world’s most magnificent sweet wines alongside France’s Sauternes and the late harvest wines of Germany.  The only difference in the fortunes of these exalted wines is that Hungary’s industry lost its lustre during...
Jun 10, 2013 by Bettane + Desseauve
The director of winemaking for Dom Perignon, is a behind the scenes role, but never the less essential. We talk with Richard Geoffroy. Painting a portrait of the creator of Dom Perignon is not easy.  Like all strong personalities, Richard Geoffroy is multifaceted, constantly changing, endlessly talented and every bit as complex as a perfectly aged bottle of Dom Perignon. The question is, how is he able to make such large quantities of such exceptional Champagne? Of course, he will not answer this question. He deftly changes the subject and...
May 22, 2013 by Tersina Shieh
April was a busy month for South African wine in Hong Kong. To celebrate the country’s Freedom Day on 27 April, the South African Consulate-General and Wines of South Africa lent their full support to various organisations in Hong Kong, including the South China Morning Post and the Hong Kong Jockey Club (HKJC), in hosting a series of South African wine activities. The SCMP South African wine evening saw 15 of Hong Kong’s South African wine distributors present more than 130 wines from 36 wineries. Wines included both internationally acclaimed...
Apr 03, 2013 by Nellie Ming Lee
One of the greatest sounds in the world is that of a cork popping – particularly when it’s from a bottle of champagne. Last year for me was filled with this delightful sound, and a number of champagnes and aged New World wines top my list of memorable bottles of 2012. Yes, there were a few dodgy wines, some of which showed glaring faults: some were corked, some showed signs of madeirisation (when a bottle has been stored or shipped in high temperatures) and some were too high in alcohol...
Apr 03, 2013 by Micky Chan
Some wine lovers or experienced wine drinkers sometimes may think of getting into the wine industry, in wine sales or as wine buyers or as a wine educator like me.  But this year, I have added an interesting role, as an international wine judge, which has been confirmed from the  International Wine and Spirit Competition (IWSC). This is a new and interesting page in my wine life.  Previously, I had some judging experience i n Hong Kong, however the IWSC is on a much bigger scale  requiring judges from all...
Apr 03, 2013 by Debra Meiburg MW
Grϋner Veltliner needs a stage name.  Difficult to find, let alone pronounce, this grape variety is saddled with an unwieldly name for a racy white wine.  Grϋner Veltliner (pronounced GROO-ner VELT-leaner) is one of the most exciting white wines in the world, but it is relatively unknown outside its Austrian homeland.  Over the last 5 years however, it has been espied on fine wine lists in Paris, London and New York, where sommeliers refer to the grape as Grϋner, Gru Vee, G.V. or Groovy. The name Grϋner Veltliner first appeared...
Mar 27, 2013 by Tersina Shieh
I had another chance recently to meet Serge and Marc Hochar, the father and son team that runs Chateau Musar high up in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon, this time tasting their whites. Anyone who has spoken with Serge would agree that he is a charismatic gentleman. He has been making Chateau Musar since 1959, and although his son recently took over day-to-day operations, Serge still retains responsibility for overall direction in winemaking and continues to present the wines around the world, a role that he clearly enjoys. Serge is a competent winemaker,...